Categories
Book Review

Implementing Lean Software Development – Book Review

Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash, by Mary Poppendieck and Tom Poppendieck is a bit old by now, but after taking a few courses on Lean practices, it is easy to see the references to this book.

And even better, some of these courses were rather generic (for use of Lean as a general practice), and this one is more specific to software.

While I did use the equivalent of some of the lean practices (specially the quick releases to get feedback), I mostly didn't test assumptions before releases, as it doesn't always make sense (sometimes it is worth developing something for the exercise or because you want to use it yourself). There are, of course, many other parts to lean practices, but this stuck with me because it is a big part of The Lean Startup, which I also read recently.

I learned a lot from this, and although a lot don't apply to me (mostly the team/large enterprise stuff), a lot does, and I will keep it in mind.

Overall, strongly recommend for developers and all interested in applying lean practices. I read the Safari version.

Categories
Book Review

The Lean Startup – Book Review

I have just finished reading The Lean Startup, by Eric Ries. I had it since 2014, and for whatever reason had not got around to reading it.

I really, really liked it. There are a lot of insights on how to run a company without guesswork – actually testing assumptions about your customers and products. Also, about the power of having quick cycles instead of multi year release dates.

There is actually a lot I've read elsewhere or had in courses, but given how the book was popular I guess that is not surprising. Some of the examples were the same, even.

Overall, excellent.

Categories
Book Review

Architects of Intelligence – Book Review

Architects of Intelligence: The truth about AI from the people building it, by Martin Ford, is a series of interviews with people who are in the forefront of AI development.

There are many names that will pop to anyone interested in the field, such as Andrew Ng (actually took an online course with him, very interesting – tan early version of https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning), Ray Kurzweil, Rodney Books, Nick Bostrom and many more.

Interviews usually talk about how they got into the field, where they see it going, when they think AGI (artificial general intelligence, sometimes also called Strong AI) will be created and how, and what will happen to jobs as AI/automation get more and more capable.

Overall, very interesting and well worth the time.

Categories
Book Review

The Only Skill that Matters – Book Review

The Only Skill that Matters, by Jonathan Levi, is a book that covers a number of techniques for learning.

Personally there was very little I learned from the book – but I had already watched his course on the subject, plus others, and I just read UltraLearning , which covers several parts of the subject.

That said, I think the book would be very adequate for those new to the subjects of memorization, speed reading and how to learn. Plus, it is quite short, and reasonably priced.

Categories
Book Review

The Healthy Programmer – Book Review

The Healthy Programmer, by Joel Kutner, is an interesting book that covers health issues as they relate to programmers.

It covers topics such as diet, exercising, preventing back pain, eye strain and more.

I didn't get a chance to apply much of the book, but it seems sound and aligns from what I've learned from medical professionals or elsewhere.

Categories
Book Review

Effective C# – Third Edition – Book Review

I've just finished Effective C#, by Bill Wagner.

There is an interesting mix of tips. Some you should already know if you learned C# from a good book, others are more obscure and very interesting.

Either way, well worth reading. My version was from Safari, as usual.

Categories
Book Review

The Single Founder Handbook – Book Review

The Single Founder Handbook, by Mike Taber,  is an interesting book focused on simple startups, not the kind where you try to get funding. It is also mostly about software developers.

I've been selling software online for 20 years (see my site for most of my software), and this was still full of interesting ideas.

In particular, I liked this version of how to generate and validate product ideas, and the chapter on how to outsource.

I also thought there were some useful insights in Routine Maintenance section, about how health, personal retreats, mastermind groups and the like.

I got the simplest version – just the ebook. I didn't see the other assets as particularly useful for the price.

Overall, pretty good, and I can recommend the basic version.

Categories
Book Review

WTF? What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us – Book Review

WTF? What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us, by Tim O'Reilly, is a book about how things are today, and how they can be, in several important areas.

It also has a lot of memories of the author in major events in technology, which I felt were quite interesting to read about (not sure how much interest younger people will have in those – being there probably makes a difference!).

There were a lot of important insights, that I wish leaders in all areas would read. I highlight every interesting idea I see, so in the end huge areas of the book were yellow.

I particularly like the reflections on why services like Uber work, and how we could make better regulations.

Overall, strongly recommended.

As usual (and since the author is the owner, not surprising) I read the book on Safari Books.

 

 

 

 

Categories
Book Review

NeuroWisdom – Book Review

I've just read NeuroWisdom: The New Brain Science of Money, Happiness and Success, by Mark Robert Waldman and Chris Manning.

The book covers current neuroscience on how to be happier and more successful, usually with simple techniques you can use every day that were proven to work on actual research.

I can't say I got around to trying most of the ideas yet, but I certainly intend to, and several I have heard from several sources.

Overall, seems well worth the time reading and applying.

Read from Safari Books. Formatting was fine (I just saw a single book that had some formatting problems this year).

Update: It was removed from Safari.

Categories
Book Review

Kotlin in Action – Book Review

Kotlin in Action, by Dmitry Jemerov and Svetlana Isakova covers the language basics of Kotlin.

Kotlin is a wonderful language that borrows from many languages, including Java, C#, and functional languages to make a very interesting, terse and highly productive language. Currently it supports compiling to the JVM, Javascript and native on several systems.

The book is supposed to be for experienced Java developers, but I have very limited Java experience and I was able to follow all of it.

I have to say I really like Kotlin, and how the language is made so that your code can be as short as possible. Even when your IDE can fill in most of the code for you, it is still a problem as you get tons of useless code to check all the time.

Overall, strongly recommended if you are interested in Kotlin.